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Asian Beetle Awareness

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The Asian Longhorned Beetle has been found in New Jersey!
The Asian Longhorned Beetle has been detected in 98 trees over a nine-acre section of Jersey City. A 1.5-mile quarantine area has been established around the site, which includes parts of Jersey City and Hoboken. The USDA is coordinating quarantine, survey, and removal efforts in Jersey City, and the New Jersey Forest Service will be assisting with the continuing 25-mile survey surrounding the New York City infestation. Cities and towns across the United States are on the lookout for the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB). While the ALB has mainly caused destruction in Chicago and New York City, and has recently been detected in Jersey City, every town has to be aware that the potential for infestation is possible and early detection is our only means to try and combat this serious pest.

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ALB Appearance:

Size: 3/4 to 1 1/4 inches long

Color: Glossy jet black body with white spots on its back

Antennae: 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 times its body length with dinstinctive black and white bands on each segment that may have a bluish-white tint

Legs: also may have a bluish-white tint


ALB Emergence Holes:

Exit holes made by the adult Asian Longhorned Beetle are about 3/8 inch in diameter or larger.

They resemble a perfectly drilled hole.

Photos courtesy of the USDA Forest Service.

HISTORY
The ALB is a native of Asia but immigrated to North America via wood packing material from China. The beetle has been intercepted at ports throughout the United States.

WHAT TREES WILL THE ALB ATTACK?
The preferred hosts of the ALB are maple trees, but it will also attack willows, poplars, ash, horse chestnuts, elm, and buckeye trees.

WHY SHOULD WE BE CONCERNED ABOUT THE ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE IN NEW JERSEY?
Maple trees comprise over thirty percent of the street tree population in New Jersey alone. If we were to get an infestation, we could lose nearly half the trees that line our streets and highways. In addition, six warehouses in New Jersey, have already been quarantined because crates imported from China were infested. The six warehouses are in Camden, Cream Ridge, Linden, Mahwah, New Brunswick, and Secaucus.

A ground survey was done in each area and as of yet the Asian Longhorned Beetle has not been detected, however the threat is real.

WHAT CAN YOU DO IF YOU SEE AN ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE?
Record the exact location of where you saw the beetle or signs of the beetle. If necessary mark/flag the infested tree. If you have an actual specimen put it in a tight jar. You can then put it in the freezer until someone can inspect it. The freezing will kill the beetle but preserve it for identification.

MOST IMPORTANT: CONTACT THE NJ FOREST SERVICE OR THE USDA FOREST SERVICE IN YOUR AREA

For more information on the Asian Longhorned Beetle Awareness Project in New Jersey or if you would like to receive some information packages to spread the awareness, please contact:

New Jersey Forest Service
501 East State Street
PO Box 404
Trenton, NJ 08625

Phone: 609-292-2532
E-mail:Asian Longhorned Beetle Awareness Project